Dallas Love Field Airport (Guide)

Dallas Love Field Airport codes areIATA:DAL,ICAO:KDAL,FAALID:DAL. Itis the 31st-busiest airport in the United States, is owned by the city. The airport is located 6 miles northwest of downtown Dallas, Texas. Southwest Airlines provides its corporate headquarters and an operating base at Love Field. Several full-service operators supply general aviation services, such as fuel, maintenance hangar rentals, air charters. It was Dallas's main airport until 1974 when Dallas / Fort Worth International Airport (DFW) opened.

Information

More about Dallas Love Field Airport (Guide)

Dallas Love Field Airport (Guide)

General information

Dallas Love Field Airport codes areIATA:DAL,ICAO:KDAL,FAALID:DAL. Itis the 31st-busiest airport in the United States, is owned by the city. The airport is located 6 miles northwest of downtown Dallas, Texas. Southwest Airlines provides its corporate headquarters and an operating base at Love Field. Several full-service operators supply general aviation services, such as fuel, maintenance hangar rentals, air charters. It was Dallas's main airport until 1974 when Dallas / Fort Worth International Airport (DFW) opened.

Capacity

According to the Annual Passenger Traffic of Dallas Airport, it reached over 16,754,262 million passengers in 2019.

Dallas Love Field Airport is busiest medium-hub airport despite its federally mandated cap of 20 gates and the banning of international travel. In 2018, Love Field prevailed 8 billion enplaned passengers for the first time.

DAL History

Dallas Love Field was built in 1917 as a training base for the U.S. Army Air Service during the war. The name of the airport is connected to Army Lieutenant Moss Lee Love, who died during flight training. It was the norm at this time to honor Army aviators who perished in flight; therefore, Love had no connection to Dallas. After World War 1, Love Field maintained the status of military airbase before the city of Dallas acquired it in 1927, clearing the way for civilian use. Commercial air service grew throughout the 1930s. Its first paved runways were finished in 1932.

The airport played a huge role in the military once again during World War 2 and after saw expansive growth as a passenger airport during the post-war. By 1965, the airport had a second parallel runway and new terminals.

In 1974 Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport’s opening came on the heels of Love Field’s busiest year to date and was meant to effectively and passenger service at Love Field.

The airport had its slowest year in 1974 and even opened an ice rink as the Love Entertainment Complex to maintain income. Love field was on its way to closure, but the founding of Southwest Airlines continued to breathe life into Love Field as the fledgling airline refused to move its operations to DFW Airport.

After an overlong battle among different parties, the Wright Amendment was instituted to confine the activities of travelers’ aircraft at Dallas Love Field to areas within Texas and the adjoining states of Arkansas, Louisiana, Oklahoma, and New Mexico. The regulations of the Wright Amendment remained law until an effort was begun to abolish it in 2005. Certain restrictions were lifted. Therefore, the entire Wright Amendment was allowed to expire on October 13, 2014.